Bulbs Flower Basics Flower Beds & Specialty Gardens Flower Garden Garden Furniture Garden Gnomes Garden Seeds Garden Sheds Garden Statues Garden Tools & Supplies Gardening Basics Green & Organic Groundcovers & Vines Growing Annuals Growing Basil Growing Beans Growing Berries Growing Blueberries Growing Cactus Growing Corn Growing Cotton Growing Edibles Growing Flowers Growing Garlic Growing Grapes Growing Grass Growing Herbs Growing Jasmine Growing Mint Growing Mushrooms Orchids Growing Peanuts Growing Perennials Growing Plants Growing Rosemary Growing Roses Growing Strawberries Growing Sunflowers Growing Thyme Growing Tomatoes Growing Tulips Growing Vegetables Herb Basics Herb Garden Indoor Growing Landscaping Basics Landscaping Patios Landscaping Plants Landscaping Shrubs Landscaping Trees Landscaping Walks & Pathways Lawn Basics Lawn Maintenance Lawn Mowers Lawn Ornaments Lawn Planting Lawn Tools Outdoor Growing Overall Landscape Planning Pests, Weeds & Problems Plant Basics Rock Garden Rose Garden Shrubs Soil Specialty Gardens Trees Vegetable Garden Yard Maintenance

How to Control Bugs on Brussel Sprouts

How to Start Lemon Seeds Indoors - watch on youtube
How to Control Bugs on Brussel Sprouts

How to Control Bugs on Brussel Sprouts. The types of bugs plaguing Brussels sprouts include cabbage root fly, caterpillars, aphids, flea beetles, Harlequin bugs, cabbage loopers, diamond back moths, imported cabbage worms, cutworms, cabbage maggots, thrips and web worms. Aphids are particularly difficult to manage and are controlled by starting...

The types of bugs plaguing Brussels sprouts include cabbage root fly, caterpillars, aphids, flea beetles, Harlequin bugs, cabbage loopers, diamond back moths, imported cabbage worms, cutworms, cabbage maggots, thrips and web worms. Aphids are particularly difficult to manage and are controlled by starting early with a very strict control program.
Things You'll Need
Brussels sprout plants
Companion plants
Insecticidal soap
Neem-oil based pesticides
Aluminum foil
Parasitic wasps
Garden fabric
Bacillus thuringiensis insecticide
Spray equipment
Plant marigolds or tagetes with Brussels sprouts. Companion planting controls pests and works by attracting beneficial insects that feed on the aphids, such as ladybirds and certain types of flies. Turnip, kale or mustard plants attract beneficial insects that feed on harlequin bugs.
Apply insecticides early in the season when the risk of killing beneficial insects is lower. Wash the leaves weekly with insecticidal, fatty-acid soaps according to recommended dosages, and then rinse the plants with a strong stream of water, and spray with organic pesticide containing neem oil. Repeat this weekly as the effects of the soap and the neem oil only last for a day or two. (Refs 4)
Place a layer of aluminum foil underneath the plants. This reflects light against the leavesí undersides, heating them and making it uncomfortable for the bugs.
Introduce parasitic wasps. These insects lay eggs inside the aphids, killing the aphids, forming brown, crusty case called a mummy. Once mummies start appearing on the plants, the aphids remaining time is short-lived. The wasp also parasitizes the diamond back moths, killing a large percentage of them.
Spreading garden fabric or floating row covers over the Brussels sprouts deters flea beetles, which are tiny beetles that jump like fleas. Regular hoeing keeps the soil around the plants clear of eggs and larvae. This also offers protection for the plants against cabbageworms.
Kill cabbageworms and loopers with a biological insecticide called Bacillus thuringiensis, also called Bt, which is sold under different brand names. Spray the plants with Bt from the time you transplant them until ready for harvest.

Check out these related posts