Bulbs Flower Basics Flower Beds & Specialty Gardens Flower Garden Garden Furniture Garden Gnomes Garden Seeds Garden Sheds Garden Statues Garden Tools & Supplies Gardening Basics Green & Organic Groundcovers & Vines Growing Annuals Growing Basil Growing Beans Growing Berries Growing Blueberries Growing Cactus Growing Corn Growing Cotton Growing Edibles Growing Flowers Growing Garlic Growing Grapes Growing Grass Growing Herbs Growing Jasmine Growing Mint Growing Mushrooms Orchids Growing Peanuts Growing Perennials Growing Plants Growing Rosemary Growing Roses Growing Strawberries Growing Sunflowers Growing Thyme Growing Tomatoes Growing Tulips Growing Vegetables Herb Basics Herb Garden Indoor Growing Landscaping Basics Landscaping Patios Landscaping Plants Landscaping Shrubs Landscaping Trees Landscaping Walks & Pathways Lawn Basics Lawn Maintenance Lawn Mowers Lawn Ornaments Lawn Planting Lawn Tools Outdoor Growing Overall Landscape Planning Pests, Weeds & Problems Plant Basics Rock Garden Rose Garden Shrubs Soil Specialty Gardens Trees Vegetable Garden Yard Maintenance

How to Grow Moss Rose (Portulaca grandiflora)

How to Grow Moss Rose (Portulaca grandiflora)

How to Grow Moss Rose (Portulaca grandiflora). With its roselike blooms, trailing habit and tolerance of less-than-ideal conditions, moss rose (Portulaca grandiflora) is a versatile and attractive annual that can brighten a hot, arid corner of the garden where few other plants will survive. Moss rose requires minimal care, though a little...

With its roselike blooms, trailing habit and tolerance of less-than-ideal conditions, moss rose (Portulaca grandiflora) is a versatile and attractive annual that can brighten a hot, arid corner of the garden where few other plants will survive. Moss rose requires minimal care, though a little maintenance goes a long way to helping the plant form healthy flowers.
A native of South America, moss rose is a sun-loving plant that requires full, all-day sun to flower. A dry, south-facing slope is best, although moss rose also works well when planted in the cracks of a rock wall or hanging basket. If you're planting it in a container, use one with a hole in the bottom for drainage. When planting multiple moss roses, allow 12 inches of space between plants. The plant's trailing habit lends itself well as a ground cover, though you can't walk on it.
Plant moss rose in a well-draining soil, such as a sandy or gravelly soil. If grown in wet, poorly draining soils, moss rose may succumb to diseases such as stem or root rot. Moss rose will grow in poor, infertile soils as well as rich soils. Though moss rose is notably drought-tolerant, regular watering during dry periods encourages flowering. Avoid overhead watering, which can harm the delicate blooms.
Check the moss rose's leaves and flower buds occasionally for aphids, small sap-sucking insects that cause feeding damage and can distort new growth. If you find them, dislodge the pests with a strong, direct stream of water from the garden hose. Pinch off spent flowers to extend the flowering period. If the plant begins to look leggy or sparse in the middle of the growing season, prune straggly growth to encourage a bushier habit. When trimming, use shears that have been wiped with a cloth soaked in rubbing alcohol. This helps prevent the spread of disease.
Moss rose can be propagated by seeds, sown directly in the garden once spring frosts have passed, or started indoors four to eight weeks earlier. Sprinkle seeds with a fine layer of soil or sand so they are only slightly covered. Mixing the tiny seeds with sand will make them easier to sow in the garden. Germination generally takes 10 to 14 days. Thin seedlings to provide young plants with at least 3 inches of space.

Check out these related posts