Bulbs Flower Basics Flower Beds & Specialty Gardens Flower Garden Garden Furniture Garden Gnomes Garden Seeds Garden Sheds Garden Statues Garden Tools & Supplies Gardening Basics Green & Organic Groundcovers & Vines Growing Annuals Growing Basil Growing Beans Growing Berries Growing Blueberries Growing Cactus Growing Corn Growing Cotton Growing Edibles Growing Flowers Growing Garlic Growing Grapes Growing Grass Growing Herbs Growing Jasmine Growing Mint Growing Mushrooms Orchids Growing Peanuts Growing Perennials Growing Plants Growing Rosemary Growing Roses Growing Strawberries Growing Sunflowers Growing Thyme Growing Tomatoes Growing Tulips Growing Vegetables Herb Basics Herb Garden Indoor Growing Landscaping Basics Landscaping Patios Landscaping Plants Landscaping Shrubs Landscaping Trees Landscaping Walks & Pathways Lawn Basics Lawn Maintenance Lawn Mowers Lawn Ornaments Lawn Planting Lawn Tools Outdoor Growing Overall Landscape Planning Pests, Weeds & Problems Plant Basics Rock Garden Rose Garden Shrubs Soil Specialty Gardens Trees Vegetable Garden Yard Maintenance

What to Plant Between a Flagstone Path

How to Start Lemon Seeds Indoors - watch on youtube
What to Plant Between a Flagstone Path

What to Plant Between a Flagstone Path. Flagstone pathways create a distinct route to a property and withstand years of wear and tear with minimal maintenance. Hundreds of plants are available to fill the gaps between flagstones while adding color and texture to offset the stone.

Flagstone pathways create a distinct route to a property and withstand years of wear and tear with minimal maintenance. Hundreds of plants are available to fill the gaps between flagstones while adding color and texture to offset the stone.
Herbs are easy to maintain and add an aromatic quality to the flagstone pathway. Roman chamomile and several varieties of thyme, including archerís gold and red creeping thyme, are adaptable to dry conditions and can be used in food preparation.
Many plants keep a tight, low-to-the-ground profile and are used between stone paths. The eleocharis radicans Miniature Rush is close in appearance to grass and hugs the ground. Several varieties of speedwell, stonecrops and sedums flourish between flagstones and can tolerate harsher climates.
Mosses are always a favorite for pathways but the soil conditions, moisture needs and shade requirements must be met for moss to survive. Sagina Irish and sagina Scotch moss match shade needs.
Because of flagstone characteristics, combining plant types will enliven a path and define borders. Consider daily traffic along with sunlight and soil conditions.

Check out these related posts